Here are a sample your comments on Hondo’s Memorial Day blog from last week:

What Memorial Day means…

Nicely written Hondo. Thank-you.

Bruce

 

Hondo,

Thank you very much for your words and the time you spent to think about and write those wonderful words. I’m not a writer, not even close. You took the time to write in a blog that many people read and I would like to take a moment to write back.

I am a Veteran. I served my country overseas for nearly 5 years. I have seen friends die and held them in my arms. Yesterday was one of the proudest and most painful days of my life. Yesterday my family and I laid to rest a wonderful young man who I held shortly after he was born. Like many American Heros he died without knowing many of the joys most of us take for granted. He was never able to hold his first born child or watch his bride walk down the isle and try to keep the tears from his eyes. He will miss out on so much yet in his 20 short years he did things and stood up for things that most never will. All of our Veterans today are volunteers but this young man did more than many. When the Army asked for Volunteers to go to Iraq he stepped up. When they asked for someone to go on a patrol he again stepped up. In the moments before he died he moved the captian that was in his Humvee to the back seat because that was the safest area for her to be in should something happen. Of the 4 Soldiers in that Humvee only the Captian survived. Heros are not born they are crafted by their life experiences.

Hondo I really don’t know why I am telling you all of this but after reading your words a dam of emotions were released and I wanted to thank you for your words and share with you some of my emotions.

Again thank you very much.

(P.S. Go Lions)

Rick

 

Hondo

I don’t have much time to write because I am about to leave for work but your Memorial Day article on your blog was great. As a veteran I thank you for that article. Proudly served. US Army OEF OIF

Jason

Here are a sample your comments on Jamal Spencer’s blog from last week:

Whats up Hondo!!

“He’s black, he has cornrows and lot’s of tattoo’s so by definition he MUST be one of these young hip-hop thugs. Give me a break.” -Jamal

You forgot to mention that he got in trouble for forcing his way into an apartment with a gun and threatened 2 guys. Or that in a press conference kept saying “practice?” basically telling youngsters who saw that, that practice means nothing. How about being fined over 50 times for either being late or missing practice. Multiple of them being playoff games. I guess being arrested for drugs and firearms still makes him an angel as well. What about the derogatory lyrics in his rapping about gays and women. I could keep going if you want me to but I dont feel thats necessary…

All I am saying is know what you are talking about before you wirte it or at least take a minute to do some research buddy.

-Ryan in Chicago

 

This e-mail is in response to Jamal’s blog.

First, I want to agree with you that rap is not a problem with society. I am considerably older than you are and that is probably why I am not a fan of rap music.

Second, I want to tell you TAKE IT EASY. Every generation music changes. When I was growing up it was Rock and Roll Is The Devil. Hey, Jamal, they were serious. Soooo, don’t take it so personal.

Thirdly, I don’t care for any type of public communication (including music) that uses swearing, the “n” word, or any type of inference of disobeying police, educators, etc. Actually I think it should be banned or illegal.

Thanks,

Ben, Brimley MI.

 

Here are a sample your comments on Tony Guastella’s blog from last week:

 

Hey Hondo—

Your latest poster (Tony) reminds me of something that happened a few years back. I was fortunate enough to snag some tickets to see the Florida Marlins in Game 5 of the 2003 World Series. Believing that the best baseball memories are made with your family I took along my two oldest daughters (in addition to my wife).

We had no sooner sat down when a group of Yankees fans, about 7-8 guys in their late 20s, early 30s sat down directly in front of us.

Was I concerned? Certainly. I was worried that the only World Series game I could afford would be a beer-laden, expletive filled experience. Did it happen? No.

To my suprise, and everlasting thanks, one of the guys turned around, said hello and asked me how old my daughters were to which I replied 9 and 7. He stated that he had some daughters and that he no longer took them to the Yankees games because the fans were so badly behaved. He then turned to all his buddies and yelled at them: “Hey Guys, young ladies here. I expect you to behave!”

And you know what Hondo, they did behave. Matter of fact those Yankee fans were wonderful even though the game was in Miami. It allowed my girls to build some baseball memories as the Marlins won Game 5 and went on to win the series in Game 6.

Raising future Spartans in Florida,

Josh -Florida

 

Hondo. There is one certain cure for these uncivilized crowds (that Tony blogged about) at CoPa… a few hundred loss seasons in a row. That way the Tigers will drive out all the fair weather fans and young kids simply out to have a good time, and the baseball purists will once again have the stadium to themselves. By the way, while I would consider myself a baseball purist I was much more embarrassed by an empty new stadium than I have ever been without the Tigers larger and more spirited crowds since they have started winning.

Mark

 

Hondo

I understand his point but someone needs to tell Mr. Guastella to come down off his high horse. People go to sporting events for different reasons…some to watch the game, some to socialize, some to interact with the crowd, some to entertain clients for work, some to enjoy a nice day outside, some to spend some time with the family and so on and so on. How many different stadiums, fields, arenas, etc has Mr. Guastella been to?? He ought to go to a New York sporting event and then he would see what bad fans are all about…

I guess Mr. Guastella should post his “rules” for how we are supposed to act at a ballgame. I mean, if we aren’t intently watching the game, we obviously don’t deserve to be there and should give up our seats to a WWII vet…i forgot to pack my bags for Mr. Guastella’s guilt trip. I completely agree that people should be courteous to others, not get drunk and that the focus should be on the game.

But seriously, who cares if people are wearing Seattle Seahawks jerseys??? Maybe it is a Seattle visitor who just happens to be proud of his football team. I know when I travel, I proudly wear my Spartan gear. And like it or not, all companies/businesses use suites and game tickets as benefits for clients and trying to get new business. Sorry, that’s the way it is. I received tickets that way for last year’s World Series and I enjoyed every bit of it. Otherwise, I would have never been able to attend that game.

Oh, and don’t get me started on whenever someone brings up the “do it for the children” crap. Ugh. Sorry, but kids hear much worse at school Monday through Friday than any thing said at a ballgame.

So the problem, for Mr. Guastella, is that even though I agree with his overall point, I have a problem with the way he communicated his point and some of the smaller points in the article don’t hold water.

Matthew